Distance Learning 2.0 Overview

How will distance learning differ this fall from spring 2020?

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Distance Learning 2.0

August 18 update: Download our Plan for Fall 2020 and Reopening Schools.

When distance learning began last spring, it was an emergency response in an attempt to slow the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the summer, dozens of working groups met to analyze feedback from students, parents and teachers, and have re-envisioned what distance learning will look like for this fall. Distance Learning 2.0 is an improved program for learning for the 2020-2021 school year.

Last spring was an all-hands on deck, fast-paced development as the pandemic took over our lives. We heard from you that your experiences varied from class to class, and school to school. You shared with us what worked well and what needed improvement, and we are ready this fall with significant improvements.

Our staff is committed to providing students and families the high-quality learning opportunities they expect. There will be more live classroom activities, meetings and small group instruction where students are online with their teacher and classmates at the same time (called “synchronous learning”). We know that in crisis-response distance learning last spring, our students and teachers missed the daily collaboration that highlights our in-person classrooms in Roseville Area Schools. There will be a better balance of synchronous learning and "asynchronous learning," where students work at their own pace to meet daily or weekly deadlines, and interactions with teachers and peers are through online text.

With increased synchronous instruction, teachers will have the opportunity to preview asynchronous learning work with students when they are meeting live, which will increase clarity in expectations.

What will a school day look like in Distance Learning 2.0?

General overview of the elementary program:

  • Students will receive five days of instruction each week at home.
  • Classroom teachers will hold engaging synchronous lessons for both the whole group and small groups at least four times a week.
  • Whole group synchronous learning (the entire class together) will not exceed two times a day, or two hours cumulative in a day.
  • Small group synchronous lessons may be provided by or in collaboration with the classroom teacher, such as interventions, English language development support, or special education services.
  • Student’s day includes morning meetings, math, reading, social studies, science, health and specials, e.g., art, physical education, music and recess.
  • Teachers interact with students through live instruction and pre-recorded video lessons. Teachers will have scheduled time available for students to connect with questions.
  • Distance learners engage in digital learning experiences that mirror in-person activities.
  • Asynchronous lessons will include short instructional videos (7-10 minutes) of specific learning targets, social and emotional learning goals, and community building.

General overview of the secondary program:

  • Scheduled classes will be split into A days (odd-hour classes) and B days (even-hour classes). Students will receive synchronous learning four days a week.
  • For each class, teachers will hold engaging synchronous learning lessons for both the whole group and small groups.
  • Students will be assigned an advisory (Parkview and RAMS), e-mentoring group (RAHS), or HOMES class (FAHS) to stay connected to one specific teacher and build community with other students.
  • Students will receive five days of instruction each week at home.
  • Small group synchronous lessons may be provided by or in collaboration with the classroom teacher, such as interventions, English language development support, or special education services.
  • Teachers interact with students through live instruction and pre-recorded video lessons. Teachers will have a scheduled time available for students to connect with questions.
  • Distance learners engage in digital learning experiences that mirror in-person activities.
  • Asynchronous lessons will include short instructional videos (7-10 minutes) of specific learning targets, social and emotional learning goals, and student interaction.

Social and emotional learning (SEL)

Distance Learning and the COVID-19 pandemic has created high levels of stress for many students, staff and families, emphasizing the importance of social and emotional well-being. As we reopen our schools, it is vital that we genuinely welcome students and staff back to school, create connections and re-establish relationships under new circumstances. Including social and emotional learning (SEL) strategies during Distance Learning 2.0 is one way to do this.

All Roseville Area Schools will include SEL practices and one or more healing methodologies. This may differ at each school, and examples include restorative circles, mindfulness, peer support groups and advisories.

Key differences between crisis-response distance learning and Distance Learning 2.0

  • More consistency in experience across the school system.
  • Increased synchronous learning (more teacher and peer interaction) in large groups, small groups and individually.
  • Daily lessons posted for all students.
  • Better engagement with students and families, in part through individualized learning contracts established in the first week of school.
  • More intentional training and professional development for educators on delivering high-quality teaching via technology.
  • Unique social and emotional learning strategies at all schools.

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